What wavelength is best for my condition?

If you have looked at the availability of rolls of red and near infrared LED lights, you will see that there is a bewildering array, between orangey-red (630nm) to out of the visible spectrum so that you can’t see it at all (940nm).

So what, you ask. Surely it doesn’t matter? Surely red light, near infrared light – it’s all the same? One wavelength is as good as another?

Wavelength matters – please be cautious!

I’ve been corresponding with lots of people over the last week. In my response, I always ask whether the query is for uncomplicated Parkinson’s disease, or for PD complicated by another neurodegenerative process. I’m not asking because I’m being nosey – the question is really important.

Continue reading “What wavelength is best for my condition?”

Talking to your doctor

This ABC story is generating interest in red lights and Parkinson’s disease.

You might want to discuss red lights with your doctor.

If you take in a copy of the ABC story, your doctor will most likely inwardly sigh and tell you not to believe everything you read.

Here’s a better idea – give your doctor original research articles!

Here’s how to do that:

Blind your doctor with science – it’s the kind thing to do…

Parkinson’s summary

I wrote the following for someone interested in the effects of red and near infrared lights in Parkinson’s Disease. It is a summary of PD-related redlightsonthebrain blog posts.
If you select the Parkinson’s tag on the blog, you get the posts that refer in some way to PD. https://redlightsonthebrain.blog/tag/parkinsons-disease/
Research findings blog posts are:
1. A summary of the findings of the people with PD using bucket light hats published in a peer reviewed journal.
2. A summary of a 2016 presentation given by Prof John Mitrofanis, an international leader in research on red lights and PD.
Interesting anecdotal blog posts are:
1. On sleep
2. On the subtlety of the effects of transcranial red and near infrared lights