Does hair matter?

I’ve had several people ask whether it would be better to fit or shave off their hair so that the transcranial light device can penetrate further into the brain tissue.

I am a great fan of head hair. It looks lovely, feels nice and most importantly, it keeps your head warm. The has a lot of blood vessels close the to surface of the skin and being bald means that a lot of heat can be lost through the head. Hair serves a useful biological function as well as being of aesthetic value.

I would not recommend removing your hair, unless you have so little hair that the removal of the last strands will make no difference. If this is the case, then why bother! Keep those gorgeous strands.

Some people find that their head hair starts to regrow. Where there had been a shiny, bald pate, fuzz has started to appear. A comb may be required. Those remaining gorgeous strands might just proliferate. Don’t argue!

If you have a lot of hair, then flaunt it and enjoy it. Don’t cut it off or shave it off. You will still get red and near infrared light onto your brain cells. Remember that photobiomodulation works by the indirect effect as well as the direct effect.

Thanks to Neil in the photo, showing off his facial hair as well as his fine coiffure.

Sleep

Matthew Walker’s book Why We Sleep is a very good read. He writes beautifully and with well-argued clarity.

Prof Walker gives very compelling evidence that sleep is not an optional human behaviour – that if we want to live well and live long, then ensuring a good night’s sleep (every night and without drugs) will make that more possible.

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Mental clarity vs brain fog

The term brain fog is not an official medical term, but we all know what it means, and we have all experienced it. Serious and creative thinking is hard enough to do at the best of times, but when brain fog descends, it is even more difficult. Unfortunately brain foggery seems to happen more often as we get older which is even more frustrating…

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The Brain Orchestra

I’ve been reading a journal article by Professors John Mitrofanis and Luke Henderson of the University of Sydney.

The title says it all: How and why does photobiomodulation change brain activity?

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Dementia

I’ve just seen and listened to Kate Swaffer, an extraordinary Australian first diagnosed with dementia at the age of 49.

Here is a link.

Kate’s message is simple and powerful. If you are given a diagnosis of dementia, don’t go home and give up.

People with dementia see the world in a different way – not better, not worse, just different.

Her message, especially if you have just been diagnosed, is that the more you do in your life, the better your life will be. Don’t hide away. Be active, take part, do things – lots of things.

We know that red and near infrared lights help – if they slow down the progression, then you win. No harm in trying.

Partners

Just as Parkinson’s is an insidious disease that creeps up and takes things away, the effect on the life of partners is just the same – insidious and inexorable.

Photo by Nani Chavez on Unsplash

For everyone with Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease or any other neurodegenerative disorder, there is almost always someone who walks alongside every step of the disease progression. It’s not the doc tor, or nurses or anyone from the local Parkinson’s disease association doing the twenty four hour shifts. It’s the partner.

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