Research summary

I was asked today if ongoing research into the effects of red and near infrared light on Parkinson’s disease is validating the early observations.

The short answer is yes.

The long answer is most definitely yes!

Here are links to recent blog posts with recent research information from the peer-reviewed medical literature.

2019 – early results from a clinical trial – here

2019 case study journal article – here

2019 clinical trial – specifically looking at changes in motor or movement symptoms – here

The microbiome

Dr Ann Liebert and her team have just published another peer-reviewed journal article specifically about the microbiome.

Parkinson’s is mentioned, but the article aimed to describe the potential for red and near infrared light to change bacterial colonies that live in our gut and thus change the way other parts of the body function.

Here is a link to the full article. It is extremely interesting.

If you haven’t started putting your Eliza, Cossack or Coronet on your tummy a few times each week, then it is worth doing. It might sound weird, but then red lights on the head were once thought to be weird.

In case the above link doesn’t work, you can download the full article.

Case study research – just published

Hot off the press is a peer-reviewed journal article describing the observations of people with Parkinson’s disease using transcranial red and near infrared light hats on a daily basis.

The title of the article is a hoot: The “Buckets”: Early Observations on the Use of Red and Infrared Light Helmets in Parkinson’s Disease Patients.

The authors are: Catherine L. Hamilton, Hala El Khoury, David Hamilton, Frank Nicklason, and John Mitrofanis.

The article is published in: Photobiomodulation, Photomedicine, and Laser Surgery.http://doi.org/10.1089/photob.2019.4663

Here is a link to the abstract, or you can download the full article.

Dr Ann Liebert – Parkinson’s SA

This afternoon researcher Dr Ann Liebert will be presenting early results of the clinical trial she has been running in conjunction with Parkinson’s South Australia. This study looked at the effects of red and near infrared light on people with Parkinson’s disease.

Dr Liebert will continue to work with Parkinson’s SA and as well, will start a new study In Parkinson’s patients in Sydney this month.

The Sydney study will use the Well Red coronet, so Ron and I are very chuffed.

The initial analysis of the SA study confirms the kinds of improvements we’ve been seeing in people using red and near infrared lights on a daily basis for Parkinson’s.

Dr Liebert has kindly agreed that I can put a summary of the early findings of her clinical trial on the blog.

It is fantastic to see research into this promising area happening in Australia. Prof John Mitrofanis and his team from the University of Sydney were the first to document the huge potential of red and near infrared lights in Parkinson’s disease.

We in Tasmania played around with LED strips, buckets and plastic-coated wire and showed that trans-cranial lights make a difference to people with Parkinson’s. Now Dr Ann Liebert’s clinical trials are helping to confirm and define the changes that red lights make.