Red lights preserve brain cells…and make more of ‘em

Prof John Mitrofanis gave an excellent presentation today to clinicians at the Royal Hobart Hospital.

He took the audience through the ten plus years of research into red lights and Parkinson’s in animal models.

Continue reading “Red lights preserve brain cells…and make more of ‘em”

LED lights versus Laser lights

I’ve had a few queries about the use of laser lights. I can understand the allure of a laser, as its coherent light with such total focus is pretty impressive.

LED lights used to be very expensive. In the last decade the costs of LEDs have really dropped, and we can now buy them easily and inexpensively. LED lights are not coherent like lasers – the light from the average LED lights scatters and shines over a bigger area.

Question: For lights on the head, are lasers better than LEDs?

Answer: Nope.

Both have their place, but the previous dominance of laser lights is being whittled away by practicality and safety of LED lights.

For trans-cranial use, you want the red lights to scatter – you want coverage of the lights over the head. You also want to use the lights daily, safely and at home.

Lasers are a pain to use, they come with safety issues and they are not suitable for home use.

LEDs are the best.

Introducing the Coronet

The ABC story showed photos of Ron Brown and me.

On the right hand side of the picture, you can see an Eliza bucket light hat, like the one Max Burr now uses.

In the middle you can see what look like coronets. Which is what we call the light device we have designed. It doesn’t have jewels on the outside, but it has fabulous pulsing individual LED lights, all controlled by sophisticated firmware.

Ron is an electronics engineer and he the genius behind this astonishing design.

  1. It is very lightweight – around 125g.
  2. It can be quickly set up to fit different head shapes, large and small.
  3. Each of the eight legs has two rows of individual LED lights, one is 670nm and the other 810nm.
  4. The Coronet has special firmware that allows us to modify key parameters:
    power pulse rate – timing – location of the light on the head
  5. It also comes with an app for android phones only (sorry, iOS users), which allows the user to pause and resume a session  –  see how long here is to go before the session finishes  –  see the technical details of what the device is doing while you wear it   –  monitor your own progress using a tremor-test and reaction test.

For Parkinson’s disease, we ensure the settings we think will work the best, based on what the research is currently indicating, for example:

  • pulsed light is far more effective than continuous red light.
  • 670nm followed immediately by 810nm works better than either alone or both together

We might be biased, but we believe the Coronet to be the most sophisticated light device available now for people with PD to try.

We have nearly sold out our first batch but will be ordering more.

If you would like more information please contact us here.

ABC Radio interview with Max and Catherine

Sarah Abbott, ABC Northern Tasmania reporter, spoke with Max Burr and me about the Tasmanian red light adventure.

Sincere thanks to Sarah and ABC Radio.

How long do I use the red lights?

I’ve been having a great discussion with a blog-reader, who was keen for his head to spend a lot more time under red and near infrared lights.

There’s an awful lot we still don’t know about works best for each type of neurodegenerative disease. Continue reading “How long do I use the red lights?”

Parkinson’s summary

I wrote the following for someone interested in the effects of red and near infrared lights in Parkinson’s Disease. It is a summary of PD-related redlightsonthebrain blog posts.
If you select the Parkinson’s tag on the blog, you get the posts that refer in some way to PD. https://redlightsonthebrain.blog/tag/parkinsons-disease/
Research findings blog posts are:
1. A summary of the findings of the people with PD using bucket light hats published in a peer reviewed journal.
2. A summary of a 2016 presentation given by Prof John Mitrofanis, an international leader in research on red lights and PD.
Interesting anecdotal blog posts are:
1. On sleep
2. On the subtlety of the effects of transcranial red and near infrared lights