More on eye lights

Prof Glen Jeffrey at University College London released the results of a small study looking at the effect of red lights (deep red 670nm in particular).

Prof Jeffrey’s work has been previously described in this blog. He and his team have clearly shown that deep red light is good for eyes.

Remember, though, only use LED lights.

Never ever use lasers on your eyes!

You can make your own eye light using LED strip and an old pair of glasses – here’s a link to a recent post showing a home-made eye light.

LED strip stickiness – a fix

This post comes from Michael Richards, the designer of the Cossack light hat which you can make at home using 12V DC LED strips.

As those of you who have made your own transcranial light device know only too well, the back of 12V DC LED strips comes with glue on the back, covered by a white peel-off tape.

Continue reading “LED strip stickiness – a fix”

Changes

I’ve spent the afternoon trying to tidy up the blog, including updating the FAQ page and making a photo of a Cossack into the logo.

The old logo of a battered bucket Eliza light hat is so yesterday.

Still a lot of work to do, but at least it has finally started, and I’m hoping that information will be easier to find over time.

I’m sure there will be the odd glitch. Such is life.

The wonderful photo is by pan xiaozhen on Unsplash

Dementia

I’ve just seen and listened to Kate Swaffer, an extraordinary Australian first diagnosed with dementia at the age of 49.

Here is a link.

Kate’s message is simple and powerful. If you are given a diagnosis of dementia, don’t go home and give up.

People with dementia see the world in a different way – not better, not worse, just different.

Her message, especially if you have just been diagnosed, is that the more you do in your life, the better your life will be. Don’t hide away. Be active, take part, do things – lots of things.

We know that red and near infrared lights help – if they slow down the progression, then you win. No harm in trying.

Partners

Just as Parkinson’s is an insidious disease that creeps up and takes things away, the effect on the life of partners is just the same – insidious and inexorable.

Photo by Nani Chavez on Unsplash

For everyone with Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease or any other neurodegenerative disorder, there is almost always someone who walks alongside every step of the disease progression. It’s not the doc tor, or nurses or anyone from the local Parkinson’s disease association doing the twenty four hour shifts. It’s the partner.

Continue reading “Partners”