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The Beginning

Constant knee pain makes it hard to be active, so in mid 2015, I did a lot of sitting and reading. One of the books was Norman Doidge’s The Brain’s Way of Healing.

Chapter 4 covered the effect of red and near infrared light on the brain and spinal cord, and there were some remarkable stories told. In passing, Doidge mentioned the positive effect of red and near infrared light on arthritic joints and damaged tendons.

I went hunting on Google Scholar and found some medical journal articles that Continue reading “The Beginning”

Connecting with others

I’ve been observing people with Parkinson’s disease using trans-cranial red and near infrared light devices for nearly four years now. I’ve learned lots of things, especially how little I knew about the realities of living with this rotten, slippery disease.

Here’s a curious thing I’ve noticed.

Photobiomodulation can help people with Parkinson’s reconnect with others

Continue reading “Connecting with others”

Research summary

I was asked today if ongoing research into the effects of red and near infrared light on Parkinson’s disease is validating the early observations.

The short answer is yes.

The long answer is most definitely yes!

Here are links to recent blog posts with recent research information from the peer-reviewed medical literature.

2019 – early results from a clinical trial – here

2019 case study journal article – here

2019 clinical trial – specifically looking at changes in motor or movement symptoms – here

Near-infrared LED strips

I’ve had a query about 12V near-infrared LED strip, especially 850nm LED strip.

You can see 850nm, but only just! 850nm is at the very edge of the eye’s ability to see. If you turn on the 850nm LED strip in a dark room, you will see a nice pale red glow. It’s red, but to our eyes it seems pretty dim. That’s good, that means it is working.

Continue reading “Near-infrared LED strips”

The microbiome

Dr Ann Liebert and her team have just published another peer-reviewed journal article specifically about the microbiome.

Parkinson’s is mentioned, but the article aimed to describe the potential for red and near infrared light to change bacterial colonies that live in our gut and thus change the way other parts of the body function.

Here is a link to the full article. It is extremely interesting.

If you haven’t started putting your Eliza, Cossack or Coronet on your tummy a few times each week, then it is worth doing. It might sound weird, but then red lights on the head were once thought to be weird.

In case the above link doesn’t work, you can download the full article.