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New research

I’m attaching a two-page report about new research into the effects of red lights (photobiomodulation) and on gait in Parkinson’s Disease.

The Spanish researchers separated the participants into two groups, one group having real 670nm red light exposure and the other having sham light exposure. The participants didn’t know whether they were getting the red light or the sham treatment.

All participants were assessed for different movement activities before and after the study period.

The participants given the sham treatment were no different at the end of the study time. The participants given the real photobiomodulation all improved in their walking and movement.

The researchers commented, “Our findings are in agreement with those of a previous study which that reported gait improvements in PD patients after trans-cranial photobiomodulation, as well as with other clinical studies that suggest that photobiomodulation could be a potential strategy against neurodegenerative diseases.”

Download the article.

Journal Article:
Santos L et al.,Photobiomodulation in Parkinson’s Disease: A randonized control trial, Brain Stimulation.

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Red lights preserve brain cells…and make more of ‘em

Prof John Mitrofanis gave an excellent presentation today to clinicians at the Royal Hobart Hospital.

He took the audience through the ten plus years of research into red lights and Parkinson’s in animal models.

Continue reading “Red lights preserve brain cells…and make more of ‘em”

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Smelling Parkinson’s

This article tells the story of Joy Milne, a Scottish nurse who realised that she could smell Parkinson’s disease. Tragically, she noticed the smell on her husband, a decade before he was officially diagnosed with Parkinson’s. The smell comes from the changes in the skin, the same changes that affect tolerance to temperature changes.

Read to the end, as Joy’s comments are very powerful. She shows how the non-movement symptoms of Parkinson’s can be far more damaging to quality of life and relationships than the tremors and other movement problems.

For more about the non-movement symptoms and their importance, read parts 4 and 5 of this post.

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What wavelength is best for my condition?

If you have looked at the availability of rolls of red and near infrared LED lights, you will see that there is a bewildering array, between orangey-red (630nm) to out of the visible spectrum so that you can’t see it at all (940nm).

So what, you ask. Surely it doesn’t matter? Surely red light, near infrared light – it’s all the same? One wavelength is as good as another?

Wavelength matters – please be cautious!

Continue reading “What wavelength is best for my condition?”

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Who should get the credit?

The original research grant application would have seemed odd – to shine red lights on mice. But look what that research has given us.

With all the media attention on red and near infrared lights, let’s celebrate the people who meticulously documented the effects of red and near infrared light.

Professor John Mitrofanis, University of Sydney.

Prof John has been the driver – he recognised that the problem in Parkinson’s Disease was cell battery malfunction – the mitochondria.

The first paper describing the effect of red light on Parkinsonism mice was published in 2010, nine years ago. The animal evidence was convincing way back then. Continue reading “Who should get the credit?”

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ABC Radio interview with Max and Catherine

Sarah Abbott, ABC Northern Tasmania reporter, spoke with Max Burr and me about the Tasmanian red light adventure.

Sincere thanks to Sarah and ABC Radio.

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Talking to your doctor

This ABC story is generating interest in red lights and Parkinson’s disease.

You might want to discuss red lights with your doctor.

If you take in a copy of the ABC story, your doctor will most likely inwardly sigh and tell you not to believe everything you read.

Here’s a better idea – give your doctor original research articles!

Here’s how to do that:

    Please read this earlier blog post about how to help your doctor
    Download and print the medical journal article article on that post. This article is by Prof John Mitrofanis and is a fabulous summary of red lights effect on brain cells.
    Please read a 2018 blog post about a new journal article. This article describes the Tasmanian case studies mentioned in the ABC story.
    Download and print this medical journal article as well.
    Take both articles to your doctor.

Blind your doctor with science – it’s the kind thing to do…

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The Beginning

Constant knee pain makes it hard to be active, so in mid 2015, I did a lot of sitting and reading. One of the books was Norman Doidge’s The Brain’s Way of Healing.

Chapter 4 covered the effect of red and near infrared light on the brain and spinal cord, and there were some remarkable stories told. In passing, Doidge mentioned the positive effect of red and near infrared light on arthritic joints and damaged tendons.

I went hunting on Google Scholar and found some medical journal articles that Continue reading “The Beginning”

Cossack movie update

Make your own Cossack red light hat.

Making the Cossack Hat Frame*

Michael provided additional information for the DIY Cossack movie.

MEASURE THE CIRCUMFERENCE.

Take a generous length of the hat padding being used, and

  • Fit around the head like a head band.
  • Adjust to fit comfortably around the head and stick together with adhesive tape .
  • Don’t cut the foam yet!
  • Mark the join,
  • Add 2cm to make the band a bit looser, then
  • Cut the padding and tape the ends together to form a circle.

Adjust this head band for easy slip-on comfort and  for it to have a jaunty tilt towards the back of head. Once satisfied with this, measure the final length. This is the final basic circumference for the preparation of the wire mesh frame.

MEASURE THE HEIGHT OF THE HAT.

Like the circumference, this will depend on the individual.

Typically, 9 squares deep (=120mm) is a good height and allows for either an elastic suspension, or for some 6mm foam pads stuck to the top.

A simple paper or cardboard pattern helps to determine these dimensions.

  • Cut a paper pattern 150mm high and the above circumference.
  • Mark the 9 square(120mm) position, and
  • Tape the pattern into a hat shape.
  • Check the height to the top of the head, and
  • Cut the paper to the height needed to fit a padded top for the hat.

         * Wire ends are sharp and can cause cuts. So please wear gloves!