Sleep

Matthew Walker’s book Why We Sleep is a very good read. He writes beautifully and with well-argued clarity.

Prof Walker gives very compelling evidence that sleep is not an optional human behaviour – that if we want to live well and live long, then ensuring a good night’s sleep (every night and without drugs) will make that more possible.

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Interest in Apathy – at last!

The more I observe people with Parkinson’s disease using photobiomodulation, the more astonishing and wonderful it is to see the positive effect of daily lights on the significant and debilitating symptom of apathy.

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Mental clarity vs brain fog

The term brain fog is not an official medical term, but we all know what it means, and we have all experienced it. Serious and creative thinking is hard enough to do at the best of times, but when brain fog descends, it is even more difficult. Unfortunately brain foggery seems to happen more often as we get older which is even more frustrating…

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Water and light…

In the last blog post, I told you about an excellent article called How and why does photobiomodulation change brain activity.

An ardent reader would know that I tend to wax lyrical about the way that red and near infrared light works directly and indirectly on the cell batteries, the mitochondria. The mitochondria contain special proteins that are able to respond to the light pulse. Some of these proteins are quite famous, like cytochrome c oxidase, which has been well studied and probably has its own fan club.

But guess what. Even if there is no cytochrome c oxidase present, mitochondria still respond to light.

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The Brain Orchestra

I’ve been reading a journal article by Professors John Mitrofanis and Luke Henderson of the University of Sydney.

The title says it all: How and why does photobiomodulation change brain activity?

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