Dementia

I’ve just seen and listened to Kate Swaffer, an extraordinary Australian first diagnosed with dementia at the age of 49.

Here is a link.

Kate’s message is simple and powerful. If you are given a diagnosis of dementia, don’t go home and give up.

People with dementia see the world in a different way – not better, not worse, just different.

Her message, especially if you have just been diagnosed, is that the more you do in your life, the better your life will be. Don’t hide away. Be active, take part, do things – lots of things.

We know that red and near infrared lights help – if they slow down the progression, then you win. No harm in trying.

Three days

Al has Parkinson’s and he started using a two-wavelength Duo Coronet in July last year, once daily in the morning.

I had an email from Al the other day, and I have his permission to quote his very interesting comments.

‘If I miss a day session, there is a gradual change in me. Bad dreams come back, my tolerance level goes way down and my lethargy goes way up.’

Continue reading “Three days”

LED strips

LED strips are great for DIY projects, such as Cossack light hats, lights for helping arthritic fingers, a LED light wrap for back pain and so on.

Here’s a photo of a Cossack light device – you can see the LED strip winding around and around the frame.

This is a Cossack light hat - the instructions for making this are on the blog. The Cossack uses LED strip - you can see the strip wound around the frame.
The instructions for making a Cossack light hat are on the blog.

LED strips should only be used for DIY projects.

You can make your own light hat using LED strips:

If you are thinking of buying a light device, make sure that it is made with individual LEDs, not a LED strip.

A device with individual LEDs is more likely to last, it will have better heat management, and it is more likely to be value for money.

As an example, a few weeks ago I made a LED strip device for my back. It uses standard gel-covered LED strip – the sewing is a bit weird but it was functional and felt pretty nice on my back after a day in the garden.

When I first made it, all three LED strips worked very happily. But as of yesterday, one of the LED strips decided to stop working part-way along its length. LED strips do that – they just stop lighting up.

There’s not much I can do about the bung LED strip. I’ll continue to use my home-made device on my back for the moment, but if more of the LED strips decide to conk out, I’ll pull it apart and make another.

The lesson is clear, though.

If you are thinking of buying a commercial light device, avoid those made with LED strips.

Case study research – just published

Hot off the press is a peer-reviewed journal article describing the observations of people with Parkinson’s disease using transcranial red and near infrared light hats on a daily basis.

The title of the article is a hoot: The “Buckets”: Early Observations on the Use of Red and Infrared Light Helmets in Parkinson’s Disease Patients.

The authors are: Catherine L. Hamilton, Hala El Khoury, David Hamilton, Frank Nicklason, and John Mitrofanis.

The article is published in: Photobiomodulation, Photomedicine, and Laser Surgery.http://doi.org/10.1089/photob.2019.4663

Here is a link to the abstract, or you can download the full article.