Prof John Mitrofanis presentation

Prof John’s presentation at the recent Melbourne conference covered two areas:

  1. the development of the research into red &near infrared light and Parkinson’s disease; and
  2. the results of recent case-studies of four Tasmanians using Eliza light hats.

I’m not able to post the exact presentation he gave a few weeks ago, but I am able to give you detailed notes that I took on 6 December 2016, when Prof John spoke to the group of people involved in the Eliza activities in Tasmania. These notes cover point (1) above.

The information Prof John covered in point (2) has been accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal, and when that article appears, I’ll be able to post it on the blog. That might not be for a few months, so keep watch on the blog.

Prof John is a superb presenter.

  • He always starts with photos of the researchers involved in the work, both in Australia and in France. He acknowledges all the contributions, and he presents the work very much as a team effort. It is a respectful and celebratory approach.
  • He has the ability to make complex things sound very straight-forward and logical. A rare gift.
  • He also shows the progression of the research, how one finding prompted a series of experiments to explore that finding, especially if it seemed wierd. Nothing was assumed, and the findings were the findings.
  • It was not until the research had progressed a long way that Prof John fully accepted that red and hear infrared lights were making a positive difference to the PD symptoms in animals with induced Parkinson’s Disease. I would have been convinced a lot earlier, but it took the accumulation of a lot of evidence before he really believed it.

How the research into red lights and Parkinson’s disease developed.

Prof John covered the information in point (1) in much greater detail in 2016 than at the recent conference.

Here are the notes from 6/12/2016. Remember, they are just my notes, nothing more.

 

Author: RedlightsontheBrain

Redlightsonthebrain is written by Catherine, a retired doctor on behalf of Light Ahead Inc, a Tasmanian-based not-for-profit organisation. Light Ahead Inc aims to help people to learn about neurogenerative diseases and the practical, safe and scientifically-based things that may be able to help. Part of this is to provide low-cost access to red light devices, hence the DIY instructions on this blog.