What wavelength is best for my condition?

If you have looked at the availability of rolls of red and near infrared LED lights, you will see that there is a bewildering array, between orangey-red (630nm) to out of the visible spectrum so that you can’t see it at all (940nm).

So what, you ask. Surely it doesn’t matter? Surely red light, near infrared light – it’s all the same? One wavelength is as good as another?

Wavelength matters – please be cautious!

I’ve been corresponding with lots of people over the last week. In my response, I always ask whether the query is for uncomplicated Parkinson’s disease, or for PD complicated by another neurodegenerative process. I’m not asking because I’m being nosey – the question is really important.

Continue reading “What wavelength is best for my condition?”

Eliza vs Cossack

I had a really good question from a blog reader today about why I recommend the Cossack design.

Look at the instructions for DIY light hat devices, and the photos of both devices, and you’ll see that Eliza is all enclosed, with a few holes at the top, and is lined with reflective foil, whereas Cossack is very open, lots of ventilation, no reflective foil. Continue reading “Eliza vs Cossack”

How do Red and near infrared lights affect the eyes?

A very interesting email arrived today, querying the effect of red LED lights on eyes.

It is all about the wavelength, not the type of light.

Red and near infrared wavelengths are not harmful to the eyes.

In fact, red wavelengths (especially 670nm, a deep red colour) are showing promise as a treatment for Age-related Macular Degeneration, a devastating progressive eye condition.

The lead researcher is Prof Glen Jeffery, professor of neuroscience at University College London.

Here’s a list of Prof Jeffrey’s publications.

And here’s a link to one of his articles.

If you are planning to make your own light hat device, make sure that you purchase red LEDs. There are LED strips available with lots of colours – avoid these as a rainbow isn’t helpful.

You just want red or near infrared wavelengths.

12 Volts DC

Be safe. Make only 12 volt light devices.

Just in case you have an urge to build an Eliza using 240 volts, then DON’T.

Light hats made with 12 Volt Direct Current work well. They are safe to make and use at home.

12 Volts DC is a safe way for us all to make and use light devices at home.

Remember the Goldilocks Effect. More power is not going to help, and if you start playing with 240 volts you are entering dangerous territory.

DO

  • Make 12 volt DC light devices
  • Use it daily
  • Email me through the blog and tell me how you are going

DON’T

  • Try using higher voltages