Water and light…

In the last blog post, I told you about an excellent article called How and why does photobiomodulation change brain activity.

An ardent reader would know that I tend to wax lyrical about the way that red and near infrared light works directly and indirectly on the cell batteries, the mitochondria. The mitochondria contain special proteins that are able to respond to the light pulse. Some of these proteins are quite famous, like cytochrome c oxidase, which has been well studied and probably has its own fan club.

But guess what. Even if there is no cytochrome c oxidase present, mitochondria still respond to light.

Continue reading “Water and light…”

The Brain Orchestra

I’ve been reading a journal article by Professors John Mitrofanis and Luke Henderson of the University of Sydney.

The title says it all: How and why does photobiomodulation change brain activity?

Continue reading “The Brain Orchestra”

What wavelength is best for my condition?

If you have looked at the availability of rolls of red and near infrared LED lights, you will see that there is a bewildering array, between orangey-red (630nm) to out of the visible spectrum so that you can’t see it at all (940nm).

So what, you ask. Surely it doesn’t matter? Surely red light, near infrared light – it’s all the same? One wavelength is as good as another?

Wavelength matters – please be cautious!

I’ve been corresponding with lots of people over the last week. In my response, I always ask whether the query is for uncomplicated Parkinson’s disease, or for PD complicated by another neurodegenerative process. I’m not asking because I’m being nosey – the question is really important.

Continue reading “What wavelength is best for my condition?”

Introducing the Coronet

The ABC story showed photos of Ron Brown and me.

On the right hand side of the picture, you can see an Eliza bucket light hat, like the one Max Burr now uses.

In the middle you can see what look like coronets. Which is what we call the light device we have designed. It doesn’t have jewels on the outside, but it has fabulous pulsing individual LED lights, all controlled by sophisticated firmware.

Ron is an electronics engineer and he the genius behind this astonishing design.

  1. It is very lightweight – around 125g.
  2. It can be quickly set up to fit different head shapes, large and small.
  3. Each of the eight legs has two rows of individual LED lights, one is 670nm and the other 810nm.
  4. The Coronet has special firmware that allows us to modify key parameters:
    power pulse rate – timing – location of the light on the head
  5. It also comes with an app for android phones only (sorry, iOS users), which allows the user to pause and resume a session  –  see how long here is to go before the session finishes  –  see the technical details of what the device is doing while you wear it   –  monitor your own progress using a tremor-test and reaction test.

For Parkinson’s disease, we ensure the settings we think will work the best, based on what the research is currently indicating, for example:

  • pulsed light is far more effective than continuous red light.
  • 670nm followed immediately by 810nm works better than either alone or both together

We might be biased, but we believe the Coronet to be the most sophisticated light device available now for people with PD to try.

We have nearly sold out our first batch but will be ordering more.

If you would like more information please contact us here.

Who should get the credit?

The original research grant application would have seemed odd – to shine red lights on mice. But look what that research has given us.

With all the media attention on red and near infrared lights, let’s celebrate the people who meticulously documented the effects of red and near infrared light.

Professor John Mitrofanis, University of Sydney.

Prof John has been the driver – he recognised that the problem in Parkinson’s Disease was cell battery malfunction – the mitochondria.

The first paper describing the effect of red light on Parkinsonism mice was published in 2010, nine years ago. The animal evidence was convincing way back then.Prof John had superb research colleagues:

Continue reading “Who should get the credit?”

Talking to your doctor

This ABC story is generating interest in red lights and Parkinson’s disease.

You might want to discuss red lights with your doctor.

If you take in a copy of the ABC story, your doctor will most likely inwardly sigh and tell you not to believe everything you read.

Here’s a better idea – give your doctor original research articles!

Here’s how to do that:

Blind your doctor with science – it’s the kind thing to do…