DIY light hat

It’s wonderful to hear from people making their own light hats. Keep them coming, and please send me photos to post on the blog. I love the creativity people bring to it.

Some important things to remember:

1. 12 volts only. No more than 12 volts, ever.

2. When you search for LED strips, and all the bibs and bobs needed, always choose the 12 volt versions.

3. My experience is that the visible red spectrum (especially 650-670nm) seems to be loved by cells anywhere in the body.

4. But the almost-visible near infrared 810-850nm wavelengths don’t work for every neurodegenerative condition.

5. When in doubt, stick to the visible red, preferably a gorgeous dark red.

How do Red and near infrared lights affect the eyes?

A very interesting email arrived today, querying the effect of red LED lights on eyes.

It is all about the wavelength, not the type of light.

Red and near infrared wavelengths are not harmful to the eyes.

In fact, red wavelengths (especially 670nm, a deep red colour) are showing promise as a treatment for Age-related Macular Degeneration, a devastating progressive eye condition.

The lead researcher is Prof Glen Jeffery, professor of neuroscience at University College London.

Here’s a list of Prof Jeffrey’s publications.

And here’s a link to one of his articles.

If you are planning to make your own light hat device, make sure that you purchase red LEDs. There are LED strips available with lots of colours – avoid these as a rainbow isn’t helpful.

You just want red or near infrared wavelengths.

Cossack photos

Some wonderful photos of a recent Cossack construction. The creator put the LED strips on the inside of the Cossack, and this required the use of lots and lots of cable ties.

Fortunately, the creator didn’t cut the ends of the cable ties, making for a very fine porcupine or echidna.

Sincere thanks for permission to post these photos.

Cutting to size:

Connecting:

The perfect Cossack frame:

The LED strip was installed inside (outside is probably easier) and held with cable ties:

It is fabulous!

Hot off the press…

Transcranial red light can improve Parkinson’s disease symptoms. This article calls for increased recognition of the huge potential of Photobiomodulation as a safe, home-based therapy in neurodegenerative diseases.

The article Exploring the use of transcranial photobiomodulation in Parkinson’s disease patients has just been published in the journal Neural Regeneration Research.

It is based on the work of Dr Frank Nicklason, Dr Catherine Hamilton, Prof John Mitrofanis, Nabil el Massri and David Hamilton.

This article provides a strong argument for faster action in clinical trials. The improvements being experienced and documented by daily light hat users provide convincing and exciting evidence that red lights on the brain do something good. Continue reading “Hot off the press…”

“To sleep, perchance to dream”

Trans-cranial red light can improve REM or dream sleep disruption in people with Parkinson’s Disease.

For spouses of people with Parkinson’s, the above quote can be a threat.

We have a protective mechanism that stops the body moving during dream or REM sleep. So while you are dreaming about running away from an enraged grizzly bear, your body is still.

One of the many awful things about Parkinson’s is that can disrupt this protective mechanism during dream sleep. This means that when the grizzly bear is chasing, your body is no longer still. You are running as fast as you can while lying in bed.

If your spouse is lying next to you, it is like war has broken out. Your frantic running from the grizzly bear results in an eruption of kicking and thrashing. You are fast asleep but your spouse has had a rude awakening.

Daily light hat use can stop warfare during dream sleep.

There has been a steady increase in the number of spouses reporting that the outbreaks of war have stopped following daily use of red light. As well, the person with Parkinson’s feels that sleep is of a better quality.

Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS)

One of the reports came from a chap who had the DBS procedure. He was initially apprehensive about using an Eliza because of his DBS, but there is no good scientific reason to suspect that there would be any adverse reaction.

His dream sleep has resumed being peaceful, and he is much happier with improved sleep. And so is his wife.