What wavelength is best for my condition?

If you have looked at the availability of rolls of red and near infrared LED lights, you will see that there is a bewildering array, between orangey-red (630nm) to out of the visible spectrum so that you can’t see it at all (940nm).

So what, you ask. Surely it doesn’t matter? Surely red light, near infrared light – it’s all the same? One wavelength is as good as another?

Wavelength matters – please be cautious!

Continue reading “What wavelength is best for my condition?”

Pulsed vs continuous light

I’ve had a number of queries about pulsed light.

There is good evidence now that pulsed light is more effective than continuous light. Maybe the cell batteries, the mitochondria like to have a little pause in between receiving a pulse of light energy and directing it into the cell as metabolic energy. It makes sense.

The other reason is that by pulsing the light, the light dose is then the average of the pulse-ON and pulse-OFF. This means you can push the power in the pulse-ON, knowing that it will be offset by the no-pulse time.

I know of several people who have gone on to pulse their LED-based Elizas and Cossacks, and I have nothing but total admiration and envy for them, but there is no way I could do that.

The reasons that I have not previously mentioned the value of pulsed light is because;

1. I couldn’t give instructions to achieve it

2. I didn’t want anyone to devalue the effectiveness of continuous red/near infrared light.

Daily unpulsed red light better than no red light.

If you are using your Eliza or Cossack with continuous red/infrared light, do not be tempted to chuck it in the corner and refuse to use it because it won’t pulse. It is still doing its very best for you, and that is a lot better than nothing.

DIY light hat

It’s wonderful to hear from people making their own light hats. Keep them coming, and please send me photos to post on the blog. I love the creativity people bring to it.

Some important things to remember:

1. 12 volts only. No more than 12 volts, ever.

2. When you search for LED strips, and all the bibs and bobs needed, always choose the 12 volt versions.

3. My experience is that the visible red spectrum (especially 650-670nm) seems to be loved by cells anywhere in the body.

4. But the almost-visible near infrared 810-850nm wavelengths don’t work for every neurodegenerative condition.

5. When in doubt, stick to the visible red, preferably a gorgeous dark red.

How do Red and near infrared lights affect the eyes?

A very interesting email arrived today, querying the effect of red LED lights on eyes.

It is all about the wavelength, not the type of light.

Red and near infrared wavelengths are not harmful to the eyes.

In fact, red wavelengths (especially 670nm, a deep red colour) are showing promise as a treatment for Age-related Macular Degeneration, a devastating progressive eye condition.

The lead researcher is Prof Glen Jeffery, professor of neuroscience at University College London.

Here’s a list of Prof Jeffrey’s publications.

And here’s a link to one of his articles.

If you are planning to make your own light hat device, make sure that you purchase red LEDs. There are LED strips available with lots of colours – avoid these as a rainbow isn’t helpful.

You just want red or near infrared wavelengths.

Cossack photos

Some wonderful photos of a recent Cossack construction. The creator put the LED strips on the inside of the Cossack, and this required the use of lots and lots of cable ties.

Fortunately, the creator didn’t cut the ends of the cable ties, making for a very fine porcupine or echidna.

Sincere thanks for permission to post these photos.

Cutting to size:

Connecting:

The perfect Cossack frame:

The LED strip was installed inside (outside is probably easier) and held with cable ties:

It is fabulous!