Exercise and Light

Exercise and photobiomodulation are both neuroprotective.

Yesterday I had a really long conversation with a physiotherapist who specialises in treating people with Parkinson’s disease. It was one of those enormously cheering conversations. Listening to someone who is extremely experienced, supremely competent and concerned for and about each patient is a delight. On top of that, to have the drive and energy to keep up with the medical literature and identify other ways to help patients is awe-inspiring.

One of the topics we discussed is the role of exercise in Parkinson’s disease. It seems that there are some who think that exercise has a minimal role in management of Parkinson’s. This is astonishing, given all the research that consistently shows that structured exercise makes a big difference.

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Mitochondria in your blood

Mitochondria get a lot of airplay in this blog. (Here’s an early post.)

The mitochondrial experts of the world have been blown away by new research. It seems that our blood not only contains the various sorts of red and white cells, but it also contains nomadic mitochondria.

This is amazing! Here’s why.

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Connecting with others

I’ve been observing people with Parkinson’s disease using trans-cranial red and near infrared light devices for nearly four years now. I’ve learned lots of things, especially how little I knew about the realities of living with this rotten, slippery disease.

Here’s a curious thing I’ve noticed.

Photobiomodulation can help people with Parkinson’s reconnect with others

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Research summary

I was asked today if ongoing research into the effects of red and near infrared light on Parkinson’s disease is validating the early observations.

The short answer is yes.

The long answer is most definitely yes!

Here are links to recent blog posts with recent research information from the peer-reviewed medical literature.

2019 – early results from a clinical trial – here

2019 case study journal article – here

2019 clinical trial – specifically looking at changes in motor or movement symptoms – here