Mitochondria have a social-life!

The discoveries about mitochondria continue to grow. A while back, it became clear that many neurodegenerative diseases, especially Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, resulted from the cell batteries, the mitochondria, failing to properly power up the cell. This results in the cell being unable to do its job, for example making dopamine. It also results in the … Continue reading “Mitochondria have a social-life!”

Magnificent mitochondria

Thomas Ryan and David Tumbarello, two British researchers, published a very interesting two-page review article due to be published in September 2021, but made available early. It seems that mitochondria, the batteries in our cells, aren’t merely being driven by other, more high-status, parts of the cell. It looks like the mitochondria themselves might be … Continue reading “Magnificent mitochondria”

Mitochondria & Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s disease researchers have had to do a complete revision of thinking. For decades, the focus has been on getting rid of an abnormal protein, called amyloid, that plonks itself  in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s. It was a reasonable hypothesis. Amyloid and Alzheimer’s seem to go together, so it seemed logical that in … Continue reading “Mitochondria & Alzheimer’s”

Mitochondria in your blood

Mitochondria get a lot of airplay in this blog. (Here’s an early post.) The mitochondrial experts of the world have been blown away by new research. It seems that our blood not only contains the various sorts of red and white cells, but it also contains nomadic mitochondria. This is amazing! Here’s why.

Wavelengths

I had an interesting query today regarding the penetration of red and near infrared light into the body. Question: Does the penetration of red and near infrared light increase as the wavelength increases? Answer: Alas, no. The human body isn’t going to make life that easy for us! Penetration studies have shown that 810 nanometres … Continue reading “Wavelengths”