Why have one Eliza when you can have two?

Life is full of revelations. In my case, this revelation is a slow realisation of the blatantly obvious.

I’ve been fretting over the instructions for a two-wavelength Eliza. These instructions will involve soldering and flash stuff like that. It’s OK for those who solder for pleasure, and who are at one with the finer points of electrical connections, but most Eliza-makers are happy to avoid unnecessary complications.

So, applying the KISS (keep it simple, stupid), I offer this pronouncement:

Make two Elizas (or Daffodils), one with the ~670nm LED strip and the other with a longer wavelength. While 810nm is the fashionable one, it has been difficult to get, whereas 850nm is much easier to find.

Then use the two light hats in sequence, one immediately following the other. I tend to use the ~670nm first, then the longer wavelength second. I’m not sure that it makes much difference which goes first, as long as one quickly follows the other.

The Goldilocks Effect…less is more.

I’ve had a few queries about using high powered LEDs, the logic being that if low powered LED strips can improve the health of neurons, then lots of low powered LEDs or high powered LEDs will do a better job. If only it were that simple…

Prof John Mitrofanis and others have shown very clearly that there is a Goldilocks Effect. They use a more scientific term, but it is the same thing.

1. Too little red/near-infrared light doesn’t do very much at all.

2. Too much red/near-infrared light can cause problems for the neurons.

3. The just-right amount of red/near-infrared light is perfect.

Prof John and his team have been able to define the “just-right” dose at the neuronal level in mice. But we have no such knowledge for humans. So we have to be cautious. Very cautious.

So, please don’t use high powered LEDs. Start at a low level of red light exposure, as we have done.

Remember that we are at the very beginning of understanding of trans-cranial lights. There continues to be wonderful research work being done and as it appears, I’ll let you know if and how this changes the approach to DIY light hats.

What I do know at this stage is: Less Is More.

Daffodil vs Eliza light hats

It is wonderful to hear about more Eliza light hats being made out of buckets. Those buckets sure are useful things.

I’ve heard from two people who are using plant pots. I did try using plant pots early on in my experiments, but the ones I bought had sloped or curved sides and I found it difficult to secure the LED strip without contorting it into a place it didn’t really want to be. However, others have been more successful, which is wonderful.

I had serious discussions with the first person to create a light hat from a plant pot.The topic was the appropriate name for the plant-pot-based light hat.

It clearly could not be Eliza because there was no bucket involved.

We agreed on Daffodil.

Click here for instructions to make your own Eliza light hat (or Daffodil)

Click here for information about tracking your progress.