Why have one Eliza when you can have two?

Life is full of revelations. In my case, this revelation is a slow realisation of the blatantly obvious.

I’ve been fretting over the instructions for a two-wavelength Eliza. These instructions will involve soldering and flash stuff like that. It’s OK for those who solder for pleasure, and who are at one with the finer points of electrical connections, but most Eliza-makers are happy to avoid unnecessary complications.

So, applying the KISS (keep it simple, stupid), I offer this pronouncement:

Make two Elizas (or Daffodils), one with the ~670nm LED strip and the other with a longer wavelength. While 810nm is the fashionable one, it has been difficult to get, whereas 850nm is much easier to find.

Then use the two light hats in sequence, one immediately following the other. I tend to use the ~670nm first, then the longer wavelength second. I’m not sure that it makes much difference which goes first, as long as one quickly follows the other.

There’s a hole in my bucket, dear Liza…

I’ve just updated the page on the evolution of the Eliza light hats. Now that it is public knowledge that Max was asked to be the first guinea pig, I can be a little more open with information and photos.

Over the first 12 months of Max’s use of light hats, I made him five different versions. I’m not sure he has ever had so much headwear!

 

 

Weekend Australian article

An article in the Weekend Australian newspaper about red light and Parkinson’s Disease covers some of the people involved in the experiences described in this blog.

The article mentioned a home-made light hat. The instructions for  making a one-wavelength version of the hat (aka Eliza) have been posted.

Instructions for a two-wavelength version of the light hat are in progress.

PS. If the link to the article takes you to a paywall, try searching for it using Google, using the search term ‘Suvi Weekend Australian’. I was able to access the full article this way.

A not-for-profit association

We have registered a not-for-profit association. We have some more administrative things to do to get it all ready for action, but it is underway.

Our aim is for this association to:

  • develop and manufacture effective and low-cost light devices
  • make the devices available for purchase through the association
  • put all profits and donations into medical research –  randomised case studies are the gold standard, but they are expensive things to run.

We had hoped that all the light devices (including Elizas) could be gifted through the association, but if this is ever possible, it is a long way into the future.

We are currently working on different models of light hats, and when we think we have identified the best we can do, we will seek funding for the development of a light hat that looks, um, civilised. Eliza bucket hats have been a great way to prototype our ideas and adapt findings from ongoing research, but they are not aesthetically pleasing…

Parkinson’s symptoms & Lights

Over the last two years we have made, for people with Parkinson’s, a number of Eliza light hats, both one and two wavelength. I’ve been musing on what they and we have been noticing. Bear in mind that each person is different, experiencing symptoms in different ways.

We have seen improvements in everyone who uses the lights daily.

The person least likely to notice any improvements is the person with Parkinson’s

Continue reading “Parkinson’s symptoms & Lights”

Have bucket, will travel…

While writing out the instructions to make light hats from buckets, I’ve been musing on the lives of the 2-wavelength light hats we have made since 2016.

What have the light hats been doing since we gave them away?

Quite a lot, it seems.

  • One went to Europe at the beginning of 2017, and floated down the Rhine, sampling the local beer.
  • Three went wandering in outback Australia. One came home but two are still out there, somewhere in the wilds of Western Australia.
  • One did a presentation to a Parkinson’s Support Group in February 2017. The participants were not impressed by the bucket’s attire but they were impressed by what its two wavelengths had been doing.
  • One is based in regional NSW but travels all over Australia, packed in a carry-on bag with socks and jocks stuffed inside the bucket next to the switch box.
  • The others are quietly working at home. They might be planning grand adventures – who knows.